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Full text of "Summer sessions"



THE NORMAL SCHOOL 
QUARTERLY 

Series 15 January, 1917 No. 62 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

ANNOUNCEMENT 



THREE TERMS SIX WEEKS EACH 



Mid-Spring Term, April 30 — June 8 

First Summer Term, June 11 — July 20 

Second Summer Term, July 23 — August 29 



1917 



Enterd August, 1902, at Normal, Illinois, as second-class matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

PUBLISHT BY THE ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY, 
NORMAL, ILLINOIS 



FACULTY FOR FIRST SUMMER TERM 



DAVID FELMLEY, LL.D., President 

EDUCATION 

EDWIN ARTHUR TURNER, A. M. 

HARVEY ANDREW PETERSON, Ph. D. 

HERMAN HENRY SCHROEDER, Ph. B. 

HARRY AMBROSE PERRIN, Ph. B. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM WECK, Ph. D. 

EDGAR PACKARD 

AUSTIN ELGIN WILBER, A. B., M. Pd. 

MATHEMATICS 

GEORGE HENRY HOWE, Ph. D. 

EDITH IRENE ATKIN, A. B. 

OLIVE LILLIAN BARTON, A. B. 

ISAAC NEWTON WARNER, B. S. 

WILLIAM HAWKES, A. B. 

HENRY HUGH EDMUNDS 

WILLIAM WRIGHT McCULLOCH 

ELSIE WETZEL 

HARVEY TRIMBLE WHITE 

COMMERCIAL BRANCHES 

ARTHUR ROWLAND WILLIAMS, A. B. 

VERLE SELLS,. A. B. 

ELMER WARREN CAVINS 

ETHEL OLDAKER 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

HOWARD WILLIAM ADAMS, B. S. 

THOMAS MORSE BARGER, B. S. 

WILLIAM LUTHER GOBLE, B. S. 

GARFIELD ARTHUR BOWDEN, B. S. 

BIOLOGY AND AGRICULTURE 

JOHN LOSSEN PRICER, A. M. 

HARRY D WIGHT WAGGONER, Ph. D. 

LILLIAN DOLE, M. S. 

ANNA BLAKE, B. S. 

ALICE JEAN PATTERSON, B. S. 

ALMA JESSIE NEILL, A. M. 

IRWIN ARTHUR MADDEN, B. S. 

THOMAS BILLINGS 

GEOGRAFY 

DOUGLAS CLAY RIDGLEY, A. B. - 
EUNICE BLACKBURN, B. E. 
MARY EVANGELINE ROBB 
HENRY HARRISON RUSSELL 

HISTORY AND CIVICS 

WM. ANDREW LAWRENCE BEYER, A. M|. 
HARRY ALBERT McGILL, A. M. 
OLIVE NEVILLE BARTON, Ph. B. 
EVERETT LEROY WALTERS, B. S. 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

ORSON LEROY MANCHESTER, LL., D. 
GORDON W ATKINS, A. M. 



THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

A. FRANCIS TRAMS, A. B. 

MRS, ELIZABETH M. CUNNINGHAM 

CLARA MAUD PENSTONE, Ph. B. 

ALMA MARY HAMILTON, A. M 

ROBERTA LEE DAVIS 

LORA MARY DEXHEIMER 

CONSTANCE SMITH 

LITERATURE 

J. ROSE COLBY, Ph. D. 
LUCINDA ELIZA GILPIN, A. M. 

READING AND PUBLIC SPEAKING 

GRACE ARLINGTON OWEN, A. M. 

NAANA LYNN FORBES 

D WIGHT EVERETT W ATKINS, A. M. 

LATIN AND GERMAN 

JESSIE ISA LUMMIS, A. B. 
HERMAN G. MILBRADT, A. B. 

MUSIC 

FRANK WILLIAM WESTHOFF 
MARION FRANCES WRIGHT 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

LYDIA CLARK 

GERTRUDE BENDER SCHILL, B. A. ' 

DOROTHY M. BUELL 

HOME ECONOMICS 

KITURAH PARSONS 

CORA IRENE DAVIS, Ph. B. 

ANNETTA BELLE COOPER, B. E. 

EDNA FLORENCE COITH, B. S. 

RUTH VIRGINIA SIMPSON 

BESSIE DAVID y 

MANUAL TRAINING 

ADNAH CLIFTON NEWELL, B. S. 

VERNE McDOUGLE, A. M. 

MARJORIE NIND, A. M. 

LAURA VAN PAPPELENDAM 

ART 

HAROLD FRANCIS JAMES 
CLARISSA ELIZABETH ELA 
MARTIN FRANCIS GLEASON 
JULIA VERNON CRISWELL 

THE TRAINING SCHOOL 

THOMAS JEFFERSON WILSON, B. E. 

MARY EMILY SMITH 

JESSIE MAY DILLON 

LAURA MARY EYESTONE, B. S 

NELLIE CATHERINE THOMPSON 

ETHEL M. GREEN 

THE LIBRARY 

ANGE VERNON MILNER 

BERTRAM FRENCH 

EDNA KELLEY 



FACULTY FOR SFXONI) SUMMRR TERM 



RALPH W. PRINGLE, M. S.. Director, 
Geometry 

MANFRED JAMES HOLMES, B. L., 
Teaching Process 

FREDERICK WILLIAM WECK, Ph. D. 

State Normal School, La Crosse, Wis., 

Psychology 

ISAAC NEWTON WARNER, B. S., 

Platteville, Wis., State Normal School, 

Algebra and Mensuration 

JOHN ARTHUR STRONG, B. E., 

Prin. Whittier School, Oak Park, 

Algebra, Arithmetic 

MARTHA HUNT, 

Shortridge H. S., Indianapolis, 

Algebra 

FRERERIC DELOS- BARBER, A. M., 
Physics 

WINFIELD SCOTT, B. S., 

Chemistry 

HARRY DWIGHT WAGGONER, Ph. D. 

Macalester College, Minn., 

Physiology 

RALPH HARLAN LINKINS, A. M., 

University of Illinois, 

Zoology 

CYRUS WILLIAM LANTZ, A. M., 

Thornton Township High School, 

Botany 

MABLE CLAIRE STARK, A. M., 
Geografy 

GORDON WATKINS, A. M., 

University of Pennsylvania, 

Sociology and Economics 

CHARLES HENRY DORRIS, M. S., 

Superintendent of Schools, Collinsville, 

History and Civics 



FRANCES MOREHOUSE, A. M., 
University of Minnesota, 

History 

JOHN ALEXANDER GEHLMAN, B. S. 
Oak Park High School, 

Grammar 

AGNES GROVES STORIE, B. S., 
Grammar 

EVA MITCHELL, A. B., 
Bloomington High School, 

Rhetoric and Literature 



FRANCES FOOTE, 
State Normal School, St. Cloud, Minn., 

The Language Arts 

ESSIE CHAMBERLAIN, Ph. B., 
Oak Park High School, 

Literature 

NAANA LYNN FORBES, 
Columbia School of Expression, 

Reading 

LILAH GEUSSENHAINER, 

Madison, Wis., High School, 

Home Economics 

BRISTOL EMERSON WING, 
La Salle Township High School, 

Manual Training 

BLANCHE WILKERSON FULKERSON, 
Art Instruction 



ANNA GRACE HOPKINS, 

Albion, Idaho, State Normal School, 

Music 

IDELLA RETTENA BERRY, 
Primary Methods 

GERTRUDE BAKER, 
Physical Education 

ANGE VERNON MILNER, 
Librarian 



MID-SPRING TERM 

April 30— June 8, 1917. 

For the convenience of teachers of seven-months' schools and of 
others who may wish to begin th.eir summer study at an early date, the 
Illinois State Normal University offers a program of studies beginning 
April 30. New classes wil be formd in all of the following courses, 
which bear the same numbers as elsewhere in the Annual Catalog. 

Major courses recite twice per day, thus affording si:^ty lessons. 
Semi-major courses recite once per day. Physics, Chemistry, Botany, 
and Zoology require three periods per day. 

1. Teaching Process Hours 2, 6 

2. Psychology 2 " 3, 7 

'11. Arithmetic Method 1 .'. " 1, 5 

15. Percentage 2 ." " 6 

16. Algebra for Beginners 4 " 1,5 

13. Mensuration 2 " 2 

24. Bookkeeping " 4 

35. Physics 2 " 2,5,6 

36. Physics 3 .| . . . . " 3,4,7 

37. Chemistry 1 " 2, 5, 6 

40. Zoology 3 , " 1, 2, 5 

42. Physiology 9 " 3, 7 

43. Botany 5 " 3, 4, 7 

55. Physical Geografy 1 " 2, 6 

60. Geografy 2 " 4 

Geografy of Eastern Continents " 1,5 

65. United States History 2 " 1, 5 

76. Civics 2 " 3, 7 

87. Grammar 2 " 3, 7 

88. Grammar 3 " 4 

94. Primary Reading " 4 or 5 

95. Method in Advanst Reading " 4 

96. Phonics " 3 

97. Reading 2 , " 7 

98. Advanst Reading " 6 

101. Orthografy " 4 

102. Writing " 6 

These ar all regular normal-school courses for which credit is given 

towards graduation. 

Courses ar numberd at the left* as elsewhere in the summer school 
announcement. 

Algebra 4, 5, 6 and Chemistry 1, 2, 3 wil be taught consecutivly in 
the mid-spring and two summer terms. Other studies of this term lead 
to advanst courses in the summer terms. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Illinois State Normal University offers for the summer of 1917 
a richer program than in any preceding year. The courses offerd num- 
ber 149. Provision is made lor a larger attendance than in 191G, which 
in the two terms totald 2845 students. 

Eighty-one instructors have been secured for the first term, twenty- 
seven for the second. Sixty of these ar members of the regular faculty. 
The others ar teachers of experience and high reputation in their re- 
spectiv branches. 

The programs consist chiefly of the regular normal courses in the 
various subjects. The daily program is so arranged that the students 
recite two hours per day in the same subject, thus completing a regular 
twelv-week course of sixty recitations in six weeks. In some subjects 
there ar courses with one recitation daily. The laboratory sciences 
require three periods per day; the shop courses four hours. 

Credits ar given for all satisfactory work, and recorded on the 
books of the institution. These wil be certified to the state examining 
board when needed. 

The primary department of the training school wil be in session 
from nine to twelv during both terms. The three training teachers wil 
illustrate the various kinds of first-year and second-year work. 

The third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth grades of the 
training school wil afford opportunity for regular practis teaching dur- 
ing the first term. 

Courses in accounting, commercial law, shorthand, and typewriting, 
ar offerd for commercial teachers. 

Special attention is invited to the courses offerd in arts and crafts 
and manual training. 

A variety of courses is offerd in gymnastics and playground man- 
agement to enable teachers to comply with the new law. 

Two full courses are provided in household science and three in 
household art. 

Teachers in country schools wil find courses in country-school 
teaching, in nature study and elementary agriculture. 

The work in agriculture wil change from year to year in such a way 
that in three summers two years' work may be completed. Employment 
for part of the day may be had upon the University farm by several 
students of this subject. 

The Coburn players wil render Romeo and Juliet, Much Ado About 
Nothing, and Yellow Jacket on the afternoon and evening of July 4, and 
the evening of July 5. Other entertainments and lectures have been 
secured. 

In addition to the regular courses in Music, a chorus wil be traind 
to render Gilbert and Sullivan's opera. Patience, on Thursday of the 
sixth week. 

Another opera wil be renderd at the close of the second term. 

Students who play upon orchestral or band instruments ar urged to 
bring them to Normal. The Normal University orchestra wil continue 
regular practis during the term. The Normal University band wil re- 
ceive new members. 



The Normal School Quarterly 



Facilities 

The location and surroundings of the Illinois State Normal Univer- 
sity ar well adapted for summer study. The elevation is 820 feet above 
sea level. The campus and surrounding streets ar wel shaded; com- 
modious homes and boarding houses stand within easy walking distance 
of the school. The bildings ar cool and wel-ventilated, with excellent 
drinking water on each floor. Normal is situated two miles north of 
Bloomington, with street cars every ten minutes. 

The laboratories ar wel supplied with modern equipment for in- 
struction in the various natural sciences, including psychology and 
geografy. 

The library of 31,000 bound volumes and '23,000 pamflets wil be. 
open at all hours until 10 P. M. 

The beautiful campus of fifty-six acres, along with the gymnasium, 
offers ample opportunity for bowling, baseball, basket-ball, tennis, 
hotkey, or other recreations. 

Expenses 

A registration fee of one dollar per term is required of all students 
intending to teach in the schools of Illinois. To such students tuition 
is free providing they ar of the required age, sixteen for girls, seventeen 
for boys. For all others the tuition charge is six dollars for a term of 
six weeks, or at the rate of $1.50 per week for a less period. Students 
of handwork and sewing pay for the materials they use. Holders of 
township scholarships are exempt from all fees. 

Text books ar sold from the text-book library at 80% of list price; 
or they may be rented at one-fourth of this price. Necessary stationery 
and instruments may be had at w^holesale cost. 

Modern rooms in Normal, accommodating two students each, rent 
for $3.00 or $2.50 a week, according to distance from campus. Rooms 
without modern conveniences rent at a lower price. Excellent modern 
rooms in Bloomingtqn, at approximately a mile's distance and with ten- 
minute street car servis, rent for $2.00 to $3.00. The 'same rooms rent 
to one person for $1.50 to $2.50. 

Board costs from $3.50 to $4.00 per week and may be obtaind 

1. At same place as room. * 

2. At nearby boarding house. 

3. At restaurants. 

Accomodations may be obtaind by . 

1. Visiting Normal early in the spring and securing them personally. 

2. Writing Miss 0. Lillian Barton, Dean of Women, giving her ex- 
plicit information as to arrangements preferd. She wil give careful per- 
sonal attention to all such requests. 

3. Arranging for them personally on the day of registration. This 
should be done thru the University to avoid engaging unsuitable rooms. 
A list of "approved rooming houses" is kept on file. 

The expenses for a term of six weeks, exclusiv of traveling expenses, 
clothing, laundry, and personal incidentals, need not excede $40 to $50. 

All students ar expected to make a defmit contract for their rooms 
and to file a copy of this contract with the president. Suitable blank 
forms may be had at the president's ofTis. 



Suiiuner School Announcement 



Admission 

All toacliers and persons expecting lo teach next year wil be ad- 
mitted without examination. Studfmts who wish to continue their 
studies in the Normal School may be admitted by high-school diploma, 
by teacher's certificate, by township scholarship, or by county diploma. 

Altho provision is made for the larger attendance in the first term, 
and many special courses ar offerd in that term only, it should be noted 
that the second term offers excellent courses and an able faculty in all 
the regular subjects. The second term is provided for students who 
cannot enter in June, and for those who wish to spend the entire sum- 
mer in study. Tt is hoped that a larger body of students wil elect the 
second term. Courses in physics, chemistry, botany, zoology, grammar, 
United States history, algebra, and geometry run thru both terms. 

Students may enter at any time. In many courses taught in both 
terms students entering late may, without serious inconvenience, com- 
plete their work in the early part of the second term. 

Registration of students wil begin at 9 A. M., Saturday, June 9. 
Members of the faculty wil be present to explain their courses. Regu- 
lar exercises in allsubjects, as shown in the inclosed program, wil begin 
at 8 A. M., Monday, June 11. All students entering school should first 
register in the president's offis. 

Registration for the second term wil begin on Saturday, July 21. 

General Directions 

Students who can conveniently do so ar urged to arrive in Normal 
on Saturday, June 9. The faculty can give them personal attention. 

Students ar advized to check their baggage thru to Normal when- 
ever it is possible to do so. 

Students arriving in Bloomington on the Big Four and Lake Erie 
& Western ar advized to check their baggage to the Chicago & Alton 
station at Bloomington. Tt may be recheckt to Normal on the Chicago 
& Alton at an expense Of six cents, the cost of a ticket to Normal. 

Arrangements wil probably be made for the Alton Limited, the 
Kansas City Limited, and the Prairie State Express to stop at Normal, 
both directions, on June 9, 10, 11, for the convenience of students ar- 
riving to attend the summer school. 

Students arriving on the limited trains of the Chicago & Alton 
on other days than those named in the preceding paragraf should leave 
the train at Bloomington. Street cars run from all the railroad stations 
in Bloomington to the Court House Square, where passengers transfer 
to the Park Street — South Main or Fell Avenue cars, which run to Nor- 
mal. 

Baggage should be left at the railway station until a boarding 
house is secured. The fee for delivering baggage from the Normal pas- 
senger station is 25 cents for less than 150 pounds. 

All students and teachers ar expected to attend General Exercises 
in the auditorium at 9:40 A. M. 



The Normal School Quarterly 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

This announcement should be carefully studied and courses decided 
upon, whenever practicable, before the student arrives in Normal. 

Courses in this announcement ar numberd consecutivly. 

The place of recitation is indicated on the daily programs, pp. 18, 
19, 36. Rooms 9 — 38 ar in the Main Bilding; rooms 40 — 69 in the Man- 
ual Arts Bilding; rooms 70 — 98 in the Gymnasium Bilding; letterd 
rooms in the Thomas Metcalf School. Geografy classes recite in the 
Library. Classes marM S recite in the Public High School. 

Major courses recite two hours daily and require in addition not 
less than 120 minutes per day of study in preparation. (They count a 
full credit.) Laboratory courses require three hours per day. 

Semi-major courses recite one hour per day and require at least 
60 minutes additional study. (Half credit.) 

Minor courses recite twice a day, but require no preparatory study. 
(Half credit.) 

Semi-minor courses recite once per day and require no preparatory 
study. (One-fourth credit.) 

Students, as a rule, should take no more than two major courses or 
their equivalent. Only mature and experienst teachers in prime helth 
and alredy familiar with the subjects elected may safely undertake 
additional work. It is, however, recommended that the young wpmen 
spend one hour a day in the gymnasium and that all with some ability 
as singers join the class in chorus practis. 

Students desiring to complete the three sciences for first-grade 
certificate ar advized to take zoology and physics one term, botany 
and physics the other term. 

For primary teachers ar especially recommended courses 1, 11, 42, 
49, 90, 94, 109, 118, 122, 125, 138, 141, 143, 144. 

For intermediate teachers,. 1, 4, 11, 50, 56, 57, 60, 72, 90, 91, 110, 
123, 125, 145. 

For grammar-grade teachers, 1, 3, 4, 12, 13, 14, 15, 42, 49, 59, 61, 
76, 85, 88, 95, 110, 145. 

For rural teachers, 9, 10, 12, 14, 24, 42, 50, 52, 53, 54, 58, 65, 66, 
82, 101, 118, 121. 

For high-school teachers, 3, 4, 5, 19, 23, 31, 40, 43, 53, 54, 61, 67, 88, 
89, 93, 98, 99, 100. 

Courses ar treated in the following order : 
1 — 10 Education 94 — 100 Reading and Public Speak- 

11 — ■ 23 Mathematics ' ing 

24 — 30 Commercial branches' 101 — 102 Orthografy and Writing 

31 — 39 Physical Science 103 — 105 Latin and German 

40 — 48 Biological Science 106—111 Music 

49 — 54 Agriculture 112 — 121 Manual Training and 

55— 64 Geografy Crafts 

65 — 76 History and Civics 122 — 129 Drawing and Art 

77 — 79 Economics and Sociology 130 — 134 Household Art 
80— 86 Literature 135 — 136 Household Science 

87— 93 The English Language 137—143 Physical Education 

144—147 The Training School 



Sumvicr School Annoimcement 



EDUCATION 

Course 1 The Teacher and The School Both Terms 

The social meaning of the public school and the aims of teaching; 
qualifications for the work; organization of the school; the lesson and 
the lerning process, including the problem of pupils' study; organization 
of lessons; the problems of school disciplin; supervision and the teacher. 
For young teachers. An equivalent of course 2. 

Text: Colgrove's The Teacher and the School. Major. (Mrs. Cun- 
ningham, Mr. Perrin, Mr. Holmes.) 

Course 2 The Teaching Process, 1 Both Terms 

This course aims to give the students a clear grasp of the nature 
and the chief elementary problems of the school — those fundamental 
things that concern all teachers all the time. Leading topics; origin 
and purpose of the public school organization; the course of study and 
the teacher's relation to it; teaching pupils how to study; the lesson 
process. 

Text: A course for older students and experienst teachers. 
Strayer's Teaching Process. Major. (Mr. Perrin, Mr. Holmes.) 

Course 3 Elements of Psychology, 2 Both Terms 

The primary purpose of this course is to lern the conditions, 
processes, and laws of mental development, as a foundation for intelli- 
gent attack upon the problem of teaching. Ten recitation periods, four 
laboratory periods per week of the same duration ar required. 

Texts: Pillsbury's Essentials of Psychology and Kirkpatrick's 
Fundamentals of Child Study. Major. (Mr. Peterson, Mr. Week.) 

Course 4 General Method, 3 First Term 

The aim of this course is to derive pedagogical principles from an 
examination of educational aims and materials, and psychological prin- 
ciples. The technique of teaching receives due attention. 

Texts: Charter's Methods of Teaching; McMurry's Method of the 
Recitation. Two sections. Major. (Mr. Turner.) 

Course 5 Educational Psychology, 11 First Term 

Its aim is training in the application of psychology to the problems 
of teaching and particularly in their experimental solution. Four 
types of lerning ar studied: motor skill, lerning verbatim, substance- 
lerning, and problem-solving, from which follow suggestions for im- 
proving school lerning. The transfer of training, the role of feeling and 
emotion in education, and experiments on methods of teaching spelling, 
writing, and arithmetic ar the remaining topics. 

Prerequisit: Course 2 or its equivalent. Three hours of labora- 
tory work a week in addition to the ten recitations. 

Text: Thorndike's Briefer Course in Educational Psychology. 
Major. (Mr. Peterson.) 



10 The Normal School Quarterly 

Course 6 Principles of Education, 5 First Term 

A study of fundamental principles underlying educational activities. 

Leading topics; educational aims, the individual and society, the sources 

of human conduct, heredity and environment, modifiability of conduct 

thru educational agencies, educational values. 

Texts: Ruediger's Principles of Education; Schroeder's Psychology 

of Conduct. Major. (Mr. Schroeder.) 

Course 7 School Management, 4 First Term 

This course includes lectures, recitations, library readings, and 
discussion upon school sanitation, school-house construction, school 
organization, examinations, promotions, disciplin, incentivs, grading and 
reports, the relation of the teacher to parents and school offisers, and 
kindred topics. 

Texts:- Tompkins' School Management; Dresslar's School Hygiene. 
Major. (Mr. Schroeder.) 

Course 8 History of Education, 6 First Term 

Education development from the Fifteenth Century. This course 
includes a study of educational thought and practis from the Renais- 
sance to the present day. Selection from the v^ritings of Comenius, 
Locke, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Herbert, Froebel, Herbert Spencer, and 
Horace Mann are red. 

Text: Monroe's Brief Course. Major. (Mr. Week.) 

Course 9 Country- School Management, 2 First Term 

Chief topics: School property — how to improve it and how to care 
for it; the organization and management of country schools; the pro- 
gram; seat work; disciplin; school-room decoration; school entertain- 
ments; cooperation with the school board. A course for young teachers. 

Text: Colgrove's The Teacher and the School. Major. (Mr. Wil- 
ber.) 

Course 10 Country-School Teaching, 1 First Term 

This course deals with the immediate problems of country-school 
teaching; what to teach and how to teach it. A discussion of phonics, 
primary reading, advanst reading, language work, arithmetic, and other 
branches of study as time wil permit. A course for young teachers 
who have not time to take longer courses in the method of the var- 
ious subjects. Three sections. 

Text material: The State Course of Study, the Beacon Primer, 
Perry Pictures. Major. (Mr. Packard. Mr. Wither.) 



Sununcr School Announcement 11 

MATHEMATICS 

Course 11 Piiimahy and Intermediate Arithmetic, 1 Both Terms 

This covers the work of the first six years and is intended to be an 
exposition of number relations in their proper order. It is designd also 
as a critical and analytical study of principles and processes. The Illi- 
nois State Course of Study forms the basis of the work. 

Text: Cook's Advanced Arithmetic. Five sections. Section A, 
B, and C wil give larger attention to Primary Arithmetic. Major. (Mr. 
Howe, Mr. Edmunds, Mr. Warner.) 

Course 12 Concrete Geometry and Mensuration, 3 Both Terms 
The purpose of this course is to arrive experimentally at the 
truths of geometry that ar of practical importance and apply them in 
the mesurements of areas and volumes. It covers every topic in the 
eighth year of the State Course of Study. Three sections. Major. (Mr. 
White, Mr. Warner, Mr. Strong.) 

Course 13 Concrete Geometry and Mensuration, 2 Both Terms 

This course deals with the more difficult topics of the preceding 

course. For older students. Two sections. Semi-Major. (Mr. Warner, 
Mr. White.) 

Course 14 Percentage and Business Arithmetic, 4 Both Terms 
When and how to teach percentage. Modern business methods in 

commission, stocks, banking, insurance, annuities, and taxation. For 

young teachers. 

Text: Thurston's Business Arithmetic. Major. (Mr. McCulloch, 

Mr. Strong.) 

Course 15 ■ Percentage Both Terms 

A brief course in the more important business applications of per- 
centage. For older students. Two sections, Semi-Major. (Mr. Mc- 
Culloch, Miss Wetzel, Miss Storie.) 

Course 16 Algebra for Beginners, 4 Both Terms 

An introductory course for students who have had no algebra. 
Text: Taylor. Chap. I. to X. Major. (Mr. Hawkes, Mr. Strong.) 

Course 17 Intermediate Algebra, 5 Both Terms 

A continuation of Course 16. Chaps. XI. — XX. 

Text: Taylor. Major. (Mr. McCulloch, Miss Hunt.) 



12 The Normal School Quarterly 

Course 18 Algebra Thru Linear Equations, 2 First Term 

This course covers the first half of the work in algebra. Special 
attention is given to the notation of algebra and to the fundamental 
theorems of algebraic processes. A thoro understanding of the logical 
development of the subject and facility in the use of number symbols 
ar the ends sought. For students who have studied algebra a few 
months. Two sections. 

Text: Taylor's Elements. Major. (Miss Wetzel.) 

Course 19 Algebra Thru Quadratics, 3 Both Terms 

This course is a continuation of Course 18 and covers the second 
half of the work in elementary algebra. Attention is given to the dif- 
ferent forms of the equation and to the use of the equation in the solu- 
tion of problems. The course includes a thoro study of the theory of 
indices, complex numbers, quadratics, and logarithms. All the topics 
taught in our best high schools ar fully treated. 

Text: Taylor's Elements. Major. (Miss Barton, Miss Hunt.) 

Course 20 The Geometry of Euclid, Plane, 3, Books 1-3 First Term 
This course covers two and one-half books of plane geometry. Some 
attention is given to the mechanism of deductiv reasoning, the proofs of 
the first few propositions being exprest in syllogistic form. A good deal 
of time is given to originals, to methods of attack, and to the modern 
fases of geometry. 

Text: Wentworth-Smith. Major. (Miss Atkin.) 

Course 21 Plane Geometry Completed, 4 Second Term 

This course is a continuation of Course 20, Plane geometry is com- 
pleted and the first book of solid geometry is studied. 
Text: Wentworth-Smith. Major. (Mr. Pringle.) 

Course 22 Solid Geometry, 2 First Term 

This course covers the whole of solid geometry. Modern fases are 

carefully studied. 

Text: Wentworth-Smith. Major. (Mr. Hawkes.) 

Course 23 Teaching of Algebra and Geometry First Term 

This course is for teachers of high-school mathematics. It wil in- 
clude the aims in teaching algebra and geometry, their place in the 
high-school curriculum, work to be offerd, best methods of presentation, 
the history of important topics. The work wil consist largely of the 
reading and discussion of reports, addresses, magazine articles, and 
books dealing with the present tendencies in the teaching of mathe- 
matics. Either subject may be taken without the other. Major. (Miss 
Atkins.) 



Sumvicr School Announcement 13 

COMMERCE 

Course 24 Elementary Bookkeeping First Term 

The inductiv development of the principles of double-entry book- 
keeping and their practical application in as many sets as the length of 
the term wil permit. 

Text: Sadler-Rowe Budget. Semi-Major. (Mr. Williams.) 

Course 25 Accounting First Term 

The theory of accounts as developt from the standpoint of the 
practising accountant. Solution of accountancy problems of varying 
difficulty. A study of the movement toward standardization in account- 
ing systems. Some knowledge of bookkeeping is prerequisit. 

Text: Klein's Elements of Accounting, supplemented by Greend- 
linger's Accountancy Problems and Bennett's Problems, and library 
references. Major. (Mr. Williams.) 

Course 26 Commercial Law First Term 

A development of the common law. of the commercial world chiefly 

by the case method. Attention wil be given to methods of teaching. 

The subject matter wil deal with some of the special applications of 

contracts. 

Text: Hufcutt's Elements of Business Law. Semi-Major. (Mr. 

Williams.) 

Course 27 Elementary Shorthand First Term 

For beginners. Thoro groundwork in the principles of Gregg Short- 
hand. The manual lessons wil be supplemented by exercises in short- 
hand penmanship. Text: Gregg's Shorthand Manual. Major. (Miss 
Sells.) 

Course 28 Advanst Shorthand First Term 

Gregg Shorthand. The aim of the course is to perfect individual 
skill in technique, speed, blackboard writing, and the practis of verba-, 
tim reporting. Review of the manual. Teaching methods. Correlation 
of shorthand and typewriting. Handling of supplementary texts. 

Texts: McClure's Exercises in Shorthand Penmanship. Gregg, 
Speed Practis. Major. (Miss Sells.) 

Course 29 Elementary Typewriting First Term 

For beginners. Operation of the typewriter by the touch method. 

Individual instruction. 

Text: Fritz-Eldridge Expert Typewriting. Two hours per day. 

Minor. (Miss Sells.) 

Course 30 Advanst Typewriting First Term 

Thoro keyboard drills followd by speed exercises. Drills in blind- 
fold work, direct dictation, and tabulation. Special attention wil be 
given to finger training. Methods of teaching illustrated. Two hours 
per day. Minor. (Mr. Williams.) 



The Normal School Quarterly 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

Course 31 General Science First Term 

(15 hours per week.) 

This course is intended for high-school teachers who wil need to 
prepare for teaching this subject in this state according to the recent 
announcement by the inspector of high schools. The course wil cover 
the purpose, the place and the content of a course in general science in 
the high school. Recent literature bearing upon the subject wil be 
reviewd and all available material such as texts and outlines wil be 
studied. 

Prerequiisits : A knowledge of the high-school sciences. 

Texts : All recent texts upon General Science. Major. Three 
hours daily. (Mr. Goble.) 

Course 32 Heat First Term 

(15 hours per week of class work. 

An advanst course of senior college rank for high-school teachers 
of physics. 

Prerequisit: Physics 4 and 5 or equivalent, and trigonometry. 

Texts: Millikan, Mechanics, Molecular Physics, and Heat, also Ran- 
dall, Heat. Major. (Mr. Bowden.) 

Course 33 Physics, 4 B First Term 

(15 hours per week of class work.) 

(a) Theory covering the following topics: Properties of matter; 
motion, force, work, and energy; uniform and accelerated velocity; 
gravitation; the pendulum; simple machines; mechanics of liquids and 
gases; heat. 

(b) Laboratory exercises covering the same topics. 

This class wil be composed of men and of women who ar preparing 
to become high-school teachers of physics. The technique of laboratory 
management wil receiv considerable attention. 

Prerequisits : Algebra and Geometry. 

Texts : Black and Davis, Fuller and Brownlee Manual. Major. 
(Mr. Barger.) 

Course 34 ' Physics, 5 B. Both Terms 

(15 hours per week of class work.) 

(a) Theory: Magnetism; static and current electricity; light 
sound. Special attention wil be given to the modern methods of lighting 
residences and school rooms. 

(b) Laboratory exercises covering same topics. 

Texts: Black and Davis' Physics, Fuller and Brownlee Manual. 
Other recent texts wil be needed for reference. 

Prerequisits for this course: Algebra, Geometry, and Course 33. 
Major. (Mr. Barger, Mr. Barber.) 



Summer School Announcement 15 



Course 35 Picvsics, 2 M. lioi ii Terms 

A course covering the same topics as course 33 but less rnatliernati- 
cal, and with less laboratory work. It is intended to meet the require- 
ments for a first-grade county elementary. certificate, and is especially 
adapted for teachers in elementary grades. Special attention wil be paid 
to the study of water supply and sewage disposal, and the lighting, heat- 
ing, and ventilating of residences and school rooms. Two sections. 

Texts: Lynde's Physics of the Household, and Fuller and Brownlee 
Manual. Major. (Mr. Goble, Mr. Bowden, Mr. Barber.) 

Course 36 ' Physics, 3 M. Second Term 

A course following course 35 with the same topics as course 34. 
Texts: Lynde's Physics of the Household, and Fuller and Brownlee 

Manual. Major. (Mr. Barber.) 

Course 37 Chemistry, 1 Mid-Spring, First, and Second Term 
The course comprises a study of the elements hydrogen, oxygen, 
nitrogen, and carbon and their compounds, of air, of the properties of 
gases, of solution, of fuels, of water supply, of fundamental laws and 
theories of the science, and of chemical calculations. Extensiv applica- 
tion of chemistry to daily life is made. 

Fifteen hours per week recitations and laboratory. 
Text: McPherson and Henderson's "A Course in General Chem- 
istry." Major. (Mr. Adams, Mr. Scott.) 

Course 38 Chemistry, 2 First Term 

This is a continuation of Chemistry 1 and includes the study of 
equilibrium, the Periodic System, and the elements nitrogen, sulfur, 
the halogens, silicon, fosforus and their compounds. 

Prerequisit: Chemistry 1 or its equivalent. 

Fifteen hours per week recitations and laboratory. 

Text: Same as for Chemistry 1. Major. (Mr. Adams.) 

Course 39 Chemistry, 3 Second Term 

This course concludes the work in General Chemistry and consists 
of a study of the metals and elementary qualitativ analysis. 

Prerequisit : Chemistry 2 or its equivalent. 

Fifteen hours of recitation and laboratory per week. 

Text: Same as for Chemistry 1. Major. (Mr. Scott.) 



16 The Normal School Quarterly 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

Course 40 Elementary Zoology Both Terms 

A study of a series of typical invertebrates, field and laboratory 
study of living specimens; dissection; collection of insects; microscopic 
study of protozoa. Effort is made to acquire real acquaintance with 
the life and habits of the forms studied, and their economic relations. 
Stress iiS laid on the study of adaptation and the evidences of evolution. 
Biology notebook and dissecting set requisit. • 

Text: Linville and Kelly. Major. (Miss Dole, Mr. Linkins.) 

Course 41 Yertebrate Zoology Second Term 

A course designd for students preparing to teach in the high schools. 
It deals with the classification, anatomy, physiology, evolution, and 
economic relations of vertebrate animals. The work consists of ex- 
periments, dissections, study of museum specimens, field study of birds 
and other vertebrates, lectures, text and library assignments. Notes 
and drawings ar made. Supplementary to course 40. 
Text: Linville and Kelly. Major. (Mr. Linkins.) 

Course 42 Human Physiology and Hygiene . Both Terms 

This course presupposes a knowledge of zoology and physics. It 
is pland to give a working knowledge of physiology and to make the 
study of hygiene an intelligent application of physiologic laws rather 
than the mastery of a set of arbitrary rules. Use is made of models, 
specimens, and fresh material. The last half of the term is devoted to 
hygiene and sanitation and involvs extensiv library reading. 

Text: Hough and Sedgwick. Major. (Miss Blake, Mr. Waggoner.) 

Course 43 Phanerogamic Botany Both Terms 

A general elementary course for those who ar preparing to teach 
botany in the high school or nature study in the graded school. It deals 
with the morfology, physiology, classification, and ecology of seed 
plants. The work consists of laboratory experiments, with notes and 
drawings, field trips, text and library assignments. Chief topics: The 
relations of the plant to soil, air,, and light; the relations of the flowers 
to insects; the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, 
food storage, and digestion. 

Text: A Textbook in Botany, — Coulter; The purchase of Gray's 
Manual is strongly advized. Major. (Mr. Pricer, Mr. Lantz.) 

'Course 44 Cryptogamic Botany First Term 

General elementary course in botany dealing with the so-cald non- 
flowering or seedless plants. A study is iiiade of representativ lower 
forms establishing an evolutionary sequence from the algae to the seed 
plants. The evolution of the plant kingdom is discust. Special emfasis 
is placed on the economic forms, viz: the yeasts, molds, bacteria, and 
parasitic fungi. Numerous experiments ar made with cultures of bac- 
teria; simple bacteriological methods ar demonstrated. This course is 
designd for students preparing to teach botany or household economics. 
Texts: A Textbook in Botany, — Coulter; and Bacteria, Yeasts, and 
Molds in the Home — Conn. Major. (Mr. Waggoner.) 



Summer School Announcement 17 

Course 45 Geneiul Zoology Fikst Term 

This course consiisis of an intensive study of the lower invertebrate 
animals, exclusive of insects. Special emfasis is given to protozoans, 
including the methods of rearing the organisims for class use, their 
relations to soils and to animal diseases. Parasitic animals and their 
economic relations also receiv considerable attention. Methods of col- 
lecting and preserving of class material in this field of zoology wil receiv 
attention and some permanent microscope slides wil be prepared. 
Text: Hegner's College Zoology. 

Prerequisit: Zoology 3 and 4 or equivalent. Major. (Mr. Wag- 
goner.) 

Course 46 Economic Entomology, 15 First Term 

This course deals specifically with the insect pests which infest the 
plants of field, garden, and orchard, and. with those which ar responsible 
for the sprod of human arid animal diseases. Studies ar made in the field 
of the insects at work. Life history studies ar made and preventiv 
mesures discust. The library is wel supplied with literature on this sub- 
ject. Major. (Mr. Waggoner) . 

Course 47 Plant Ecology, 18 First Term 

A study of the influence of . environment on plant structures and 
plant distribution. The more important factors which control plant 
growth and development ar considerd, and many applications of the prin- 
ciples discoverd ar made to agricultural practis." The course includes 
field work and the solving of simple ecological problems. 

Text: Coulter, Barnes, and Cowles' Textbook of Botany. Vol. 2. 
Major. (Miss Blake.) 

Course 48 Plant Pathology Second Term 

This course consists of a study of the more important plant diseases 
which ar causd by fungi, bacteria, and slime molds. A large part of the 
time iis spent in making collections of diseased plants and plant Organs.. 
The rest of the time is spent in lerning to identiffy the different diseases, 
in making culture studies of the parasitic organisms, in the making of 
permanent microscope slides of diseased plant tissues, and in the con- 
sideration of preventiv and curativ mesures. 

Text: Duggar's Plant Diseases. Major. (Mr. Lantz.) 



18 



The Normal School Quarterly 






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20 The Normal School Quarterly 

AGRICULTURE AND NATURE STUDY 

Course 49 Nature Study First Term 

A course for teachers in graded schools. A study of farm, garden, 
and ornamental plants, with methods of propagation and culture as 
exemplified in the school garden; some common fungi, especially those 
producing diseases on economic plants; common trees and weeds; in- 
sects, birds, and other animals closely related to agriculture, and horti- 
culture, soils, with experiments related to plant production. 

Text : Practical Nature-Study, Coulter, Coulter, and Patterson. 
Major. (Miss Neill.) 

Course 50 Agricultural Nature Study First Term 

A course for country teachers based upon the state course in nature- 
study-agriculture. It considers the material available in country dis- 
tricts; methods of manipulation and presentation, including simple ex- 
periments and various collections; discussion of modes of relating the 
work to the home activities of the children and correlating it with 
language, physiology, and constructiv work. Helpful books and bulletins 
ar discust. 

Texts: Lesson Plans for Teachers in Nature-Study-Agriculture.. 
Mann's Beginnings in Agriculture. Major. (Miss Patterson.) 

Course 51 Nature-Study Method First Term 

A course for special teachers of nature study. It includes a survey 
of material, including children's gardens, preparation of outline, methods 
of presentation, and the relation of the lower grade work to elementary 
science and agriculture. 
Semi-Major. (Miss Patterson.) 

Course 52 Floricuture First Term 

A course designd to giv students practical knowledge in floricul- 
ture. Chief topics: Principles of plant growing, the flowering plants 
for house and garden; plant propagation, landscape gardening, floral 
decoration. Two hours per day in the library, two hours of practical 
work. 

Text: Bailey's Garden Making. Major. (Mr. Billings.) , 

Course 53 Elementary Stock Feeding, 2 First Term 

A .study of the classes of food nutrients and their functions in the 
animal body. Digestion, absorption, and assimilation. The extent and 
nature of the demands for food for maintenance, growth, fattening, milk, 
wool, and work. The principles involvd in the selection of rations. 
Choice of feeding stuffs and the compounding of rations. 

Text-book: Henry and Morrison. Major. (Mr. Madden.) 

Course 54 Soil Physics First Term 

A study of the formation and classification of soils; capillary, 
hygroscopic, and gravitational water, the affects of drainage and color 
of soils on soil temperature, the granulation and puddling of soils; the 
preparation of the seed bed and the proper tillage for the various crops. 
Texts: Lyon and Fippin's Soils and Mosrer and Gustafson's Soil 
Physics. Major. (Mr. Madden.) 



Summer School Announcement 21 

GEOGRAFY 

Course 55 Physical Geografy, 1 or 9 First Term 

The Land, the Ocean, the Atmosfere, Mathematical Geograi'y. 

The study of the land wil he a treatment of the processes by which 
the surface of the land has been shaped, and of typical land forms with 
reference to their origin, history, and influence upon man. Local field 
trips wil be a part of the class work. The mathematical geografy out- 
lined in the State Course of Study wil be treated. 

Maps, charts, and other publications of the state and federal gov- 
ernment wil be used. 

Text: Salisbury's Modern Geografy, Physiografy notebook, four 
pamflets on Important Topics of Geografy. Major. (Mr. Russell.) 

Course 56 Home Geografy, 2 First Term 

This course deals with the fourth year Geografy of the State Course 
of Study. The scope and purpose of Home Geografy wil be developt, 
observation work carried on, experiments made, field trips taken, illus- 
trativ material studied, observations recorded and grafically represented. 
This course is especially adapted to those who ar to teach begin- 
ning work in geografy. 

Texts: State Course of Study, McMurry's Excursions and Lessons 
in Home Geografy, any Physical Geografy. Semi-Major. (Miss Robb.) 

(Bourse 57 Intermediate Geografy, 2 First Term 

This course deals especially with fourth and fifth year geografy as 
outlined in the State Course of Study. The scope of these two years 
wil be set forth, difficult topics selected and treated in full, observation 
work carried on, field trips taken, illustrativ material studied. Library 
work wil be important. 

Texts: State Course of Study, McMurry's Excursions and Lessons 
tholomew's Atlas. Semi-Major. Two sections. (Miss Robb.; 

Course 58 Geografy Method for Country^ School, 3 or 10 First Term 
This course is especially pland for country teachers. It deals with 

the outlines for geografy in the State Course of Study as a whole. 

Special w^ork is then d©ne on each year's outline. 

Texts: Herbertson's Man and His Work, Tarr and McMurry's 

Second Book, Bartholomew's Atlas, State Course of Study. Major. ,(Miss 

Blackburn.) 

Course 59 Geografy of North America, 4 First Term 

This course develops a method of continental study. It covers the 
topics of the State Course of Study for North America. Special emfasis 
wil be given to the regional and industrial geografy of the United States. 
Much library reading is required. Maps wil be constructed and inter- 
preted, and illustrativ material freely used. For teachers of grammar 
grades. 

Texts: Mills' International Geografy (library copies), Tarr and Mc- 
Murry's Second Book, Bartholomew's Atlas, Four pamflets on Important 
Topics in Geografy. Major. (Mr. Russell.) 



22 The Normal School Quarterly 

Course 60 Human Geografy, 2 Second Term 

A study of the influence of natural conditions on the occupations and 
institutions of man. Typical regions studied. The course deals mainly 
with those topics given under the topical outline for the study of a con- 
tinent in State Course of Study. 

Texts : Herbertson's Man and His Work, Bartholomew's Economic 
Atlas. Semi-Major. (Miss Storie.) 

Course 61 Commercial Geografy, 6 Both Terms 

This course deals especially with industrial topics of geografy. 
Man's work as a producer and a trader is made prominent. The term's 
work furnishes material for the proper teaching of the industrial topics 
which run thruout the geografy as outlined in the State Course of Study. 
It deals with topics of value to students of domestic science, domestic art, 
and manual training. Valuable to teachers of all grades. Teachers- 
College Credit may be obtaind by preparing special theses in addition 
to the regular class work. 

Texts: Smith's Industrial and Commercial Geografy, Bartholo- 
mew's Atlas. Major. (Miss Blackburn, Miss Stark.) 

Course 62 Geografy of Illinois " First Term 

• 

Illinois as a geografic unit. An intensiv study wil be made of physi- 
cal features, natural resources, industries, transportation routes, and 
cities. Materials suitable for programs during the Centennial of 1918 wil 
receiv attention. For experienst teachers, senior-college students, and 
students who have completed at least one other major in geografy. 

Texts: Bulletins State Geological Survey: nos. 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 15, 
26, 27; Base Map of Illinois. Library copies ar available. Students may 
obtain some or all at slight expense from Director, State Geological 
Survey, Urbana, 111. Major. (Mr. Ridgley.) 

Course 63 Conservation of Natural Resources, 16 First Term 
A study of the natural resources of the United States and the world; 
their use and their conservation; the conservation movement in the 
United States, with especial reference to soil, forests, minerals, water. 
For senior college students and experienst teachers. Major. (Mr. 
Ridgley.) 

Course 64 Method in Geografy, 12 Second Term 

Scope of geografy as a school study, the basis of a course of study, 
its orderly development and method of presentation in the grades and 
the high school. Detaild work on a limited portion of the course of 
study by each member of the class; preparation of reference lists for 
collateral reading; observation in training department. A senior-col- 
lege course for superintendents, principals, and special teachers of 
geografy. 

Texts: McMurry's Special Method in Geografy, State Course of 
Study, Course of Study in Training School, Four pamflets on Important 
"topics in Geografy, Bartholomew's Atlas. Major. (Miss Stark.) 



Saninicr Sc/iool Aimounccnicnt 23 



HISTORY AND CIVICS 

Course 05 Thk F()uni)in(j of the American Nation, 2 First Term 
A study of seventh-grade history. Period studied, 1492-1800. Events 
in Illinois liistory are studied from the national point of view. Various 
textbooks ar examind, and methods of using them diacust. 

Text: Forman's Advanced History. Major. (Miss 0. Barton.) 

Course 66 History of the United States, 3 Both Terms 

A course for young teachers, covering the period from 1800 to the 

present day. Attention is given to Illinois history from the national 

point of view. The organization of material, the use of reference books 

and other aids wil be discust and illustrated. 

Text: Forman's Advanced History. Major. (Miss 0. Barton, Mr. 

Dorris.) 

Course 07 Advanst United States History, 4 Both Terms 

A course for experienst teachers, with chief emfasis upon the de- 
velopment of the American people sinc^ the adoption of the Constitu- 
tion. 

Text: Bassett. Major. (Mr. Walters, Miss Morehouse.) 

Course 68 Recent American History, 5 First Term 

An intensiv study of our development since the Civil War. The 
work of Reconstruction, followed by an analysis of our social, industrial, 
and political development since 1876. For advanst students. 
Text: Bassett. Major. (Mr. Beyer.) 

Course 69 Ancient History, 8 First Term 

The purpose of the course is such a study of the arts, customs, and 

institutions of ancient people as wil enable the student properly to 

appreciate the modern world. 

Text: West's Ancient World. Major. (Miss Lummis.) 

Course 70 Medieval History, 9 Second Term 

This course includes a brief study of the leading events and charac- 
teristic institutions of the middle ages, their origin, development, and 
modification in the transition to the modern period. 
Text: Robinson. Major. (Miss Morehouse.) 

Course 71 Modern European History, 10 First Term 

In this course the political and religious revolutions, the unification 

of Germany and Italy, and the growth of industrial democracy wil receiv 

chief attention. 

Text: Robinson. Major. (Mr. McGill.) 

Course 72 Methods in Intermediate History First Term 

The impulses of the children wil be analyzed and a basis for good 
teaching establisht. The relation of historical events to geografical con- 
ditions wil be developt. Illustrativ constructiv work and the co-ordina- 
tion of history with other school work ar features of the course. 

Texts : Earle's Home Life in Colonial Days, Forman's History of the 
United States. Minor. (Miss Robb.) 



The Normal School Quarterly 



Course 73 History of Illinois First Term 

Geografy and Geology as determining historical development. The 
Indians and the French explorers. Chief events in our political history. 
Development of means of transportation. Growth of our industries. 

Texts: Moore and Robinson, Smith's Students' History for refer- 
ence. Semi-Major.- (Mr. McGill.) 

Course 74 Civil Government of Illinois First Term 

The historical development of the state government, the state in- 
stitutions, and executiv boards; the new departmental organization; 
county and city government; the state school system. 

Texts: Greene and Trowbridge. Semi-Major. (Mr. McGill.) 

Course 75 Civics, 1 First Term 

A course for young teachers who have not studied civics in the high 

school or had experience in teaching it. 

Text: Forman's American Republic. Major. (Mr. Walters.) 

Course 76 Civics, 2 Both Terms 

The causes leading to the present forms of American government 

wil be sought, while its machinery wil receiv due consideration. 

Texts: Forman's Advanced Civics; Fiske's Civil Government. Major. 

(Mr. Beyer, Mr. Dorris.) 

Course 77 Economics, 2 Both Terms 

The theory of economic forces, in the main, as developt in Seager's 
Economics. The Industrial History of England and of the United 
States. Discussion of socio-economic problems. The economic forces 
as makers of history and geografy. Outlines of economic matter that 
can be introduced in the grades in connection with the work in geografy, 
history, arithmetic, and in general exercises. The course is especially 
designd to help teachers in handling the economic fases of the common- 
school branches. Major. (Mr. Manchester, Mr. G. Watkins.) 

Course 78 Sociology, 5 Both Terms 

The nature of the study; the causes which affect the life of society; 

nature and analysis of social activities; social evolution; social control, 

the function of education. 

Text: Hayes's Introduction to the Study of Sociology. Minor. (Mr. 

G. Watkins.) 

Course 79 Social Problems First Term 

After a brief preliminary survey of sociological theory, this course 
is a careful study of several great problems that ar sociological rather 
than economic — immigration, crime, poverty, pauperism. 

Texts : EUwood's Sociology and Social Problems, and Wolfe's Read- 
ings in Social Problems. Major. (Mr. G. Watkins.) 



Suituner School Announcement 25 

LITERATURE 

Course 80 Poethy and the Novel, 1 Second Term 

A class study is made of Matthew Arnold's Sohrab and Rusturn, and 
George Eliot's Silas Marner. Scott's Quentin Durward and Tennyson's 
The Princess ar red and reported in essays for class discussion. Major. 
(Miss Mitchell.) 

Course 81 Wordsworth- Milton-Emerson, 2 First Term 

Narrativ and lyric verses, in the volunie of selections from Words- 
worth, made by Matthew Arnold, and the great epic in Paradise Lost, 
form the basis of the work in the classroom. Emerson's Essays, first 
series, and Thackeray's Henry Esmond ar red outside and discust in. class. 
Essays by Lamb, Bacon, and Stevenson ar red for comparison of types. 
Major. (Miss Gilpin.) 

Course 82 Literature Method First Term 

A comprehensiv course in method and the conditions that determin 
method. It includes a study of the essential nature of literature; its 
right to a place in the curriculum; its proper function there; the various 
facts and conditions to be considered in determining a course of study 
and of the problems that arise in the actuaL teaching. 

Text: Colby's Literature and Life in School. Major. (Miss Colby.) 

Course 83 Shakspere, 3 First Term 

Macbeth and Hamlet ar studied in detail in class. Julius Caesar, 

Midsummer Night's Dream, and Richard III. ar red and then carefully 

discust in class. 

The chief purpose of the course is to give an understanding of the 

drama, its essential nature, its structure, its limitations, and its powers. 
Texts : Shakspere, Arden, Rolfe's, Hudson's, or Porter's First Folio 

Edition. Major. (Miss Gilpin.' 

Course 84 Literary Types, 5 Second Term 

This course includes a study of lyric and narrativ verse, of the 
essay, the novel, and the drama. Its purpose is to make clear what 
kind of knowledge of these literary types ar necessary' for one who would 
teach them intelligently. 

Text: Johnson's Forms of English Poetry. Major. (Miss Cham- 
berlain.) 

Course 85 American Poetry Second Term 

A course in rapid reading of the American poets from Bryant to 
Moody and Peabody. While most attention is given to the work of 
Bryant, Poe, Emerson, Longfellow, Whittier, Holmes, Lowell, Whitman, 
and Lanier, who ar included in the text used, the course is ment also to 
giv some knowledge of later or minor poets. 

Text: Page's Chief American Poets. Major. (Miss Chamberlain.) 

Course 86 The English Drama First Term 

A study of the development of the drama from 1300 to 1650. It in- 
cludes a rapid reading of many Elizabethan plays. 

Text: Neilson's Chief Elizabethan Dramatists. Major. (Miss Colby. » 



The Normal School Quarterly 



THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

Course 87 The Sentence, 2 Both Terms 

The work of the course is confined to sentence analysis. All ele- 
ments of ordinary sentences wil be studied, but verbals wil not in this 
course be divided into their classes, participles, infmitivs, or Gerunds. 
Three sections. 

Text: Gowdy. Major. (Miss Hamilton, Mr. Gehlman.) 

Course 88 The Parts of Speech, 3 Both Terms 

This course deals ihiefly with the more formal parts of grammar, 

classification and inflections, but it presupposes a good knowledge of 

sentence analysis. Nouns, pronouns, verbs, verb-phrases, and verbals, 

wil receiv most attention. Two sections. 

Text: Gowdy. Semi-Major. (Miss Davis, Mr. Gehlman.) 

Course 89 Method in Grammar, 1 Both Terms 

This course is intended for experienst teachers and advanst students 
and includes all the work outlined in the preceding courses. Two sec- 
tions. 

Text: Gowdy. Major. (Miss Penstone, Mrs. Cunningham, Miss 
Storie.) 

Course 90 The Art of Story Telling Both Terms 

This is a new course to consider the use and selection of stories in 
the middle and upper grades, as wel as the manner of telling them. The 
work includes: 

1. The analysis of the story to determin emfasis and balance. 

2. Lists of suitable stories for different grades. 

3. Practis in lerning and telling. 

Text: Bailey. Four sections. Semi-Major. (Miss Smith, Miss 
Foote.) 

Course 91 Language — Intermediate Grades Both Terms 

This course wil be based upon the State Course of Study. The re- 
lation of the language work to the other work of the separate grades wil 
be shown. Illustrativ methods and devices wil be discust and typical 
class exercises required. The poems and stories in the State Course and 
others suited to the intermediate grades wil be studied. Four sections. 
Text : Lessons in English, Books I and IL Gowdy and Dexheimer. 
Semi-Major. (Miss Dexheimer, Miss Foote. ^ 

Course 92 Elements of Rhetoric Both Terms 

The study of the sentence, the paragraf, and the whole composition, 
followd by theoretical and practical work in the four forms of prose dis- 
course. 

Text: Scott and Denny's Composition-Rhetoric. Major. (Mr. Trams, 
Miss Mitchell.) 

Course 93 Science of Discourse First Term 

A course in advanst rhetoric for high-school graduates, including 

forms of composition and methods of development, qualities of style, and 

a discussion of practical devices in teaching composition. Four weekly 

themes ar required. 

Texts: Barrett Wendell's Composition, Herbert Spencer's Philos- 

ofy of Style. Major. (Mr. Trams.) 



SiDinHcr School Aiinoii iici'mciil ^11 



READING 

Course 94 Piiimaiiy Ukading Boih Tkiims 

A discussion ol" the various problems that ai'iso in teaciiing rc^ading 
in the primary grades. The psychology of modern methods. Black- 
board lessons based on nature study, literature, and play. Preparation 
of book lessons, observation of teaching. 

Text: Huey's Development and Psychology of Reading. Semi- 
Major. (Miss Owen, Miss Forbes.) 

CoTRSE 95 Method in Advanst Reading Both Terms 

This course deals with the problems of teaching reading in the 

up" er grades. 

Text: How to Teach Reading, Clark. Semi-Major. (Mr. D. Wat- 

kii" 1, Miss Foote.) 

Coi RSE 96 Phonics Both Terms 

The work in phonics wil not be connected with reading except suffi- 
ciently to apply it. It wil consist of a-rticulation drills, practis upon the 
English sounds and study of their formation, and discussion of the rela- 
tion of articulation to expression. 

Texts: Drill-Book in Dictionary Work, DeGarmo; A Manual of 
Pronunciation, Ardmore. Semi-Major. (Miss Forbes, Mr. Cavins.) 

Course 97 Reading, 2 Both Terms 

The first consideration in this course is an understanding of the 
spirit of literature, and that literary appreciation must precede vocal 
expressions. Then the various essentials of interpretativ reading are 
studied. Finally, thruout the course reading aloud is made the mesure- 
ment and test of th^ student's grasp of the life of literature. 

Text: Classes for Vocal Expression, Curry. Semi-Major. (Miss 
Forbes, Miss Foote.) 

Course 98 Advanst Reading, 3 Both Terms 

The primary purpose of the course is to show what poetry is, and to 

train the student in rendering it orally. It deals with various examples 

of poetic art. 1. Intellectual, imaginativ, and emotional aspects of 

literature. 2. The elements of lyric, epic, and dramatic poetry. 3. 

Rhythm, rime, alliteration, assonance, tone-color. 4. Analysis as a 

preparation for oral expression. 

Text: English Poetry, Its Principles and Progress, Gayley and 

Young. This course may be taken either as a Semi-Major or as a Major. 

(Mr. D. Watkins, Miss Forbes.) 

Recitals 
During each term a recital wil be given by the members of the read- 
ing classes. 



28 The Normal School Quarterly 

Course 99 Extemporaneous Speaking Both Terms 

The preparation and delivery of original speeches. The student is 
shown that effectiv speaking grows- out of obedience to accurate laws 
and that it is never a matter of impulse. The impelling motivs, the 
factors of interestingness, the central idea, the ends of speech are the 
chief details of this course. 

Text: Effectiv Speaking, Philips. Semi-Major. (Mr. D. Watkins.) 

Course 100 Debating Both Terms 

The theory of argumentation, with practis in preparing briefs. In 
the oral debates that follow stress is laid on oral delivery. This course 
wil not be taught unless at least eight students elect it. 

Text: Foster's Argumentation. Semi-Major. (Mr. D. Watkins.) 

Course 101 Word Analysis and Orthografy First Term 

Work in orthografy for the seventh and eighth years as outlined in 
the State Course of Study, word analysis being the principal feature. 
Two sections. Semi-Major. (Mr. Cavins.) 

Course 102 Penmanship First Term 

Drill in movements as outlined in the State Course of Study. This 
work wil be offerd in six sections : Section A, using the blackboard and 
drilling with musical accompaniment; Sections B and C, with vertical 
script; Sections D, E, and F in the Palmer Method light-line script. 
Semi- Minor or Semi-Major. (Mr. Cavins, Miss Oldaker.) 

LATIN AND GERMAN 

Course 103 Method in First Year Latin, 1 First Term 

Altho the course is primarily to illustrate to teachers the method of 
teaching what is ordinarily the first year's work in Latin, yet the course 
may be utilized by any one who wishes to review rapidly work that he 
has done before; it may be taken by one who has never studied Latin if 
he wil devote his whole time for study to this course. Major. (Miss 
Lummis.j 

Course 104 Beginning German, 1 First Term 

After a proper study of the essentials of German grammar, with 

simple reading and writing exercises, the class reads thirty-five pages 

of such prose as Grimm's Dornroeschen and Anderson's Die Nachtigall. 

Text: Bacon. Major. (Mr. Milbradt.) 

Course 105 Advanst German First Term 

This course wil include (a) Much rapid work in sight reading of 
moderate difficulty from Bacon's "Im Vaterland'" and similar books; (b) 
Practis in conversation involving the vocabulary of every-day Jife, 
covering such topics as wether, seasons, and climate, the school bilding, 
the house and its furnishings, gardens and their products, the home town, 
the sale and purchase of goods at various stores, a trip to Europe, etc., 
etc.; (c) The writing of compositions in German on the above topics; 
(d) The lerning of typical songs. Major. (Mr. Milbradt.) 



Suinnicr School Announcenicnt 29 



MUSIC 

Course 100 Song Sin(iIN(j, 1 Fikst Term 

This is a course for beginners, or those wlio have made little or no 
attempt at singing. The emfasis is placed on the singing of rote songs. 
Thru these songs the student forms a practical acquaintance with : 

(a) two-part, three-part, and four-part mesure; 

(b) the major scale and the tonic arpeggio, do, mi, sol, do; 

(c) the simple tone lengths; 

(d) scale-parts and intervals in terms of the ear; 

(e) symbols of music. 

A few minutes each day ar taken for vocal drill to secure light and 
flexible tones. 

Text: WesthofT, Elements of Music in Song. Semi-Minor. (Miss 
Wright.) 

Course 107 Sight Reading, 2 Both Terms 

Songs lernd thru imitation. The elements of music — ear concepts 
— deduced from the familiar songs. Notation — eye concepts — as it pic- 
tures the familiar musical elements. Written work as a further means 
for eye training. Key and mesure signatures and all forms of notation 
necessary to the intelligent reading of vocal music. 

Texts: Westhoff, Elements of Music in Song; Westhpff, Songs for 
Sight Singing, Series 1. Minor. (Miss Wright, Mr. Westhoff, Miss Hop- 
kins.) 

Course 108 Advanst Sight Reading First Term 

This course is for students who have fmisht course (2), or its equiv- 
alent, and who intend to teach in intermediate or grammar grades. 

(a) The major, minor, and chromatic scales; intervals and chords; 
modulation and key relationship. (b) More extended practis in solos, 
quartet, and chorus singing wil be afforded in the study of an opera to 
be given a public presentation during the last week of the first term. 
Texts: Progressiv Music Reader, No. 4; Westhoff, Songs for Sight 
Singing, Series 3. Minor. (Mr. Westhoff.) 

Course 109 Methods in Primary Music Both Terms 

Rote songs. How to select and how to teach them. Care and use of 

the child voice in singing. Discussion of modern methods of teaching 

music. Working out of course of study for the primary grades. 

Texts: Progressiv Music Reader, 1 and 2. Semi-Minor. (Mis.s 

Wright, Miss Hopkins.) 

Course 110 Methods in Public School Music First Term 

Classification of the elements of music and the presentation of the 
parts in logical succession. The problems involvd in the art of reading 
vocal music, considerd from the teacher's point of view. Tone produc- 
tion and classification of voices in the upper grades. Song interpreta- 
tion. 

Text: Progressiv Music Reader, Book 3. Semi-Minor. (Mr. West- 
hoff.) 

Course 111 Music for Country Schools Second Term 

The selection of suitable songs for ungraded schools. The manage- 
ment of the different voices. Teaching the elements of music to the 
older pupils. 

Text: Westhoff, Elements of Music in Song. Semi-Minor. (Miss 
Hopkins.) 



30 The Normal School Quarterly 

MANUAL TRAINING 

Course 112 Bench Work in Wood ' Both Terms 

The various tool processes used by the woodworker "are taught in 
this course. The needs of each person wil be considerd, as the work is 
largely individual. Sharpening of tools, the study of equipments and 
materials receiv attention. A course of study in woodwork wil be out- 
lined. Major, Minor, or Semi-Minor. (Mr. Newell, Mr. Wing.) 

Course 113 Wood Turning and Pattern Making Both Terms 

The various processes used by the wood turner at the lathe ar 

taught. The pattern making course wil illustrate important principles, 

such as draft, shrinkage, parting, cores, fillets, etc. 

Prerequisit: Bench Work in Wood. Minor or Semi-Minof. (Mr. 

Newell, Mr. Wing.) 

Course 114 Manual Training Organization First Term 

Lesson plans, equipments, courses of study, class demonstrations. 
The literature of manual training. Semi-Major. (Mr. Newell.) 

Course 115 Elementary Manual Training First Term 

A course in thin wood and care and use of tools, for the fifth and 
sixth grades, together with the elements of carpentry. Semi-Minor. 
(Mr. McDougle.) 

Course 116 Mechanical Drawing Both Terms 

Lettering, geometrical drawing, working drawings. Orthografic 

projection, development of surfaces, intersections, tracing and blue 

printing. 

Text: Problems in Mechanical Drawing, Bennett. Minor. (Mr. 

McDougle, Mr. Wing.) 

Course 117 Architectural Drawing First Term 

Architectural lettering, conventions, drafting of small one-story 

house, mechanical perspectiv, shades and shadow^s, complete set of plans 

of small two-story house designd by pupil. Minor or Semi-Minor. (Mr. 

McDougle.) 

Course 118 Construction Work for Primary Grades Both Terms 
A study of material and manipulation in paper cutting and folding, 

cardboard, textils, raffia, etc. Semi-Minor. Four sections. (Miss Van 

Pappelendam, Miss Fulkersori.) 

Course 119 Book-Binding First Term 

Problems of progressiv difficulty, suitable for primary, intermediate, 
and upper grades, and which may be given in the regular schoolroom 
without expensiv equipment, such as: pamflets, portfolios, notebooks, 
albums, and scrap books. Repairing of books wil be included. Minor or 
Semi-Minor. (Mr. McDougle.) 



Summer School Announcement 31 



CounsE IL'O J\)TTEFiy FiiisT Tefim 

The course in pottery includes free modelinf,^ coil bilding, work on 
potter's wheel, the making of molds, and casting. Glaze-making, its 
firing into pottery, together with a study of kilns and firing is an im- 
portant feature of the course. During the class discussion some knowl- 
edge is gaind of the history of potters and pottery, as wel as acquaint- 
ance with the various forms of pottery, past and present. A sequence of 
problems is workt out which is adaptable for public school use. Design 
is a prerequist. Minor. (Miss Nind.) 

Course 121 Art Metal and Jewelry Making First Term 

The processes of etching, sawpiercing, inside and outside raising, 
repousse, riveting, .and soldering, ar studied in working with silver, 
brass, and copper. Problems possible in the grammar school and high 
school ar workt out with an amount of individual freedom in choice of 
problems. 

Design is a prerequisit. Minor. (Miss Nind.) 

ART INSTRUCTION 

Course 122 Elementary Drawing • • First Term 

In this course is treated the drawing of objects which have little 
foreshortening or convergence. Simple free expression is sought; hints 
of various media are given. Thiis is an opportunity for teachers to gain 
skill in the drawing that they may do in connection with science, lan- 
guage, literature, and history. The problems include nature studies, 
common objects, pose and illustrativ sketches. Pencil, crayon, char- 
coal, and water color wil be used. Semi-Minor. Three sections. (Miss 
Ela.) 

Course 123 Principles of Drawing Both Terms 

A sixty-lesson course for students who expect to take no other 
course in drawing. It deals with the various points of technique, and 
ehdevors to develop in the students the power to see common objects 
and represent them with crayon and pencil. Minor. (Mr. James, Miss 
Criswell, Miss Fulkerson.) 

Course 124 Light and Shade First Term 

The medium used is charcoal. The studies ar in flat values; grada- 
tion of tone and interpretation of color; beauty in composition and form 
as an important motiv. Two sections, one emfasizing blackboard draw- 
ing. For advanst students. Semi-Minor. (Miss Ela.) 

Course 125 Color Both Terms 

The aim of this course is the training of the color sense. This re- 
quires some knowledge of color theory and a training of the eye to dis- 
cover color in nature. There is a discussion of the spectrum, of color 
characteristics, color values, color combinations. The studies ar vases, 
books, fruits, vegetables, fl owners, plants, and landscapes. Minor ov Semi- 
Minor. (Miss Criswell, Mr. James, Miss Fulkerson.) 



32 The Normal School Quarterly 

Course 126 Principles of Design Both Terms 

The theories underlying design in its various phases ar exemplified 
in this course. The application of these theories to decoration, pictorial 
composition and industrial activities ar emfasized. Line, form, and 
color. Minor. (Mr. Gleason, Miss Fulkerson.) 

Course 127 Home Decoration First Term 

This course thru the study of the planning and decoration of the 
ordinary house aims to develop appreciation for simple, harmonious 
color and line as they ar used in bilding and furnishing. Much attention 
wil be given to the selection and proper assembling of house furnishings, 
the products of commercial sources. This course is pland so as to be 
practical in application. Minor. (Mr. Gleason.) 

Course 128 Picture Study First Term 

The aim of this course is the development of appreciation of the 
educativ value of pictures thru the study of a series representativ of 
various types, suitable for children of varying ages. This series includes 
many of the pictures suggested in the State Course of Study. Methods 
of using the various types wil be introduced as applied to history, nature 
study, humane instruction and other school work. Semi-Minor. (Mr. 
Gleason.) 

Course 129 Painting First Term 

A study of picture-making: how to paint, what to represent, and 
how to organize a picture. Problems ar first workt out in a simple dry 
medium, later in oil. Minor. (Mr. James.) 

Course 130 Art for Rural Schools First Term 

In this course due consideration is given to conditions affecting 
time and opportunity for this subject in rural schools. Much of the 
work is pland so as to develop an understanding and appreciation for 
color and form, thru correlation with various subjects — language and 
nature study. Seat work time is utilized in the lower grades. 

This is a general course and much wil be given that may be applied 
directly to class-room work. Semi-Minor. (Mr. Gleason.) 

HOUSEHOLD ART 

Course 131 Needlework, 1 First Term 

This course includes work in handsewing, darning, mending, crochet, 
and knitting, applied to problems suitable for elementary and high- 
school classes. It also includes an analysis of ornamental stitches and 
their application to a piece of simple embroidery. 

A study is made of distinctiv types of embroidery. Four hours 
daily. Major. (Miss Simpson.) 

Course 132 Garment Making, 2 Both Terms 

This course deals with the fundamental principles of construction. 
It givs practis in fundamental stitches in handsewing, in the use of the 
sewing machine, in the drafting of patterns and in the planning, cut- 
ting, fitting, and finishing of simple garments. 



Summer School Announcement 33 

Problems in design, textils, and economics ar considerd in connec- 
tion with this technical work. Class limited to twenty. Four hours 
daily. Major. (Miss Cooper, Miss Geussenhainer.) 

Course 133 Dressmaking, 3 First Term 

This course givs practis in drafting and modeling patterns, in the 
use of commercial patterns, in the cutting, fitting, and finishing of a 
iinen or gingham dress and of a tailord cloth skirt. Problem,? in design, 
textils, and economics are considerd in connection with this technical 
w^ork. 

Prerequisit course II. or its equivalent. Class limited to twenty. 
Four hours daily. Major. (Miss Davis.) 

Course 134 The Theory of Household Art First Term 

This course brings together the subject matter in construction, 
stitches, textils, design, and economics and organizes it as the basis for 
the solution of suitable problems to present to elementary and high- 
school classes. 

Comparison of courses of study in different schools under varying 
conditions of equipment and management is made. One hour daily. 
Minor. (Miss Cooper.) 

Course 135 Textils ■ " First Term 

A study of yarn structure, weaves, and finishing of fabrics as affect- 
ing beauty and wearing qualities: microscopic, physical, and chemical 
tests for the recognition of fabrics and adulterations. 

The work to form the basis for the selection of clothing and house- 
furnishings. Semi-Minor. (Miss Davis.) 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

Course 136 Practical Cookery Both Terms 

The' object of the Course in Cookery is to familiarize the student 
with the most helthful, attractiv, and at the same time economical 
methods of preparing and serving such articles of diet as ar found on the 
wel-appointed table. The work is based on a study of the food prin- 
ciples. Three classes, limited to eighteen members each. Students 
registerd in order of application. 

Three hours daily. Major. (Miss Parsons, Miss David, Miss Coith, 
Miss Geussenhainer.) 

Course 137 Advanst Cookery, 2 Both Terms 

The second course in cookery provides instruction and practis of 
an advanst character and a wider application of the principles studied in 
the first course. 

The course in household management is a systematic study of the 
duties of the housekeeper, embracing the foundation, administration, and 
maintenance of the home. Sanitation, household accounts, laundry work, 
and domestic servis ar all included in this course. 

Open to all who hav completed Course 1. Class limited to eighteen. 
Students registerd in order of written application. 

Three hours per day. Major. (Miss Parsons.) 



34 The Normal School Quarterly 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

Course 138 ' Helth Methods and First Aid First Term 

A study of modern methods in promoting the helth of school chil- 
dren. Heat, lighting, ventilation, posture, exercise, adenoids, vision, in- 
fection, and such instruction as is necessary to meet the needs of emer- 
gency work on the play-ground ar included. 

Text: Educational Hygiene. Semi-Major. (Miss Clark.) 

Course 139 Play-Ground Supervizion First Term 

A theoretical course dealing with the meaning of play and the pos- 
sibilities of the play-ground. Problems of equipment and organization 
of rural and city play-grounds. Plays, games, and folk dancing. Must 
be accompanied by course 140. 

Text: Curtis's Practical Play-Ground Supervizion. Semi-Major. 
(Miss Schill.) 

Course 1^0 Elementary Folk Dancing Both Terms 

Practical work in folk dancing selected and arranged to meet the 
needs of the play-ground and schoolroom. Dances selected are simple, 
but appeal strongly to children. In connection with course 139. Semi- 
Minor. (Miss Buell, Miss Baker.) 

Course 141 Advanst Folk and Esthetic Dancing Both Terms 

Folk, national, demi-character dances, and simple esthetic move- 
ments for upper grades and high schools, including dances for school 
festivals. Discussion of pageants and festivals. Library references. 
Two sections. Section B wil spend much time upon pagentry and wil 
count as semi-major. Semi-Minor. (Miss Clark, Miss Baker, Miss Buell.) 

Course 142 Public-School Gymnastics, 3 Sections Both Terms 
Gymnastic exercizes, and work adapted to meet schoolroom condi- 
tion in all grades. The relation of posture to helth. Nomenclature and 
technique of teaching. Minor. (Miss Schill, Miss Baker.) 

Course '143 Gymnastics with Apparatus First Term 

More difficult gymnastic movements. Wands, dumbels and floor 

apparatus. A continuation of course 141. Semi-Minor. (Miss Clark.) 

Course 144 Plays and Games Both Terms 

A practical graded course in plays and games, progressivly arranged 
from the simple folk game to the more highly organized games for the 
upper grades. Semi-Minor. (Miss Baker, Miss Buell.) 

Course 145 Organized Games for Play -Ground Both Terms 

Team games appropriate for competition on play-grounds and high 
school; indoor base ball, captain ball, newcomb, volley ball, and basket 
ball. Discussion of methods. A hart examination wil be requird of all 
persons taking this course. Semi-Minor. (Miss Schill, Miss Baker.) 

Costume 
Navy blue bloomers of light weight material, preferably cotton, all 
white middy blouses, and black tennis shoes ar required. Suits can be 
oraerd after arrival, or bloomers rented for fifty cents. 



Summer School Announcement 

So 



THE TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

^■"'^''^^6 Observation Work 

Two first grades and the second grade of ih. f. ■ • u "^^ 

in session from nine to twelv each riav wifh f. '^"'"^ ''"'°°1 ^'1 be 
in each grade. The programs wUshm ea h t" f'^"''^"«« of 30 children 
jit the same hour each day ^^866 eMiZi ' '° ' f'''°" ""'''^''^S 
tvork. All who take this course are ptrTfH, ?7'''"^ ^'""^ »' P''""ary 
^he alternate days at the cZesDondtarhn''^ tl " ""' ^■««"«Sion on 
•'■eadings are assignd. SeZ-Maior 7m^ ^u"" ^^' afternoon. Library 
Eyestone, Miss Berry.) ^ ^^"' Thompson, Miss Green, Miss 

COUBSE147 Primary Methods 

%.ervS:^tst^ 1- r- --- « -^"r 

students enrold in the course nhT. o^^^ervation work, 
and attend the discussions fnZ aft noonTn'tT^°' ''^ ^'^'^ '"°™''^^ '^^"y. 
iVo hours per day of outside study arreq„ird for T'"'°'"i'"' ^'''"'■ 

reauSLTl/^^Sfnrr'- ^-H^^l Slions ar ' 

sohor^^r^ciirrsrc-ra:^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Good Teacher, (4) The Recitation (5) The aS ^f^^'^'^f ^cteristics of a , 
cip m m the Primary Grades, (7) The Making nfr ^'"''^T'^'S' (6) Dis- 
gestiv Seat Work, and (9) RecreatiV Games"^ "' ^"'^°" ^'»^' ^'> ^"8" 

in tea:hLrrrdiSr"prni:^^irr^ r^^;'^^^^"^" °^ '^^ ^-^^ ^*- 

The selection of subject matter an/the methot°of t '"t'"^"''' '''■ ^'^ 
accomplish these aims. (3) Devices forTrnfn T^'""^ necessary to 
metic, etc., ar given and il ustrated in th k "'*'"'°^' ^^'''''"S arith- 
outline of work in the Statfcourse of S "dv 'f:'""" '''''"'■ (« The 
the work. Major or Minor. (mLs Berry ) ^"^Sestions regarding 

#°T''' PKACTIS TEACHING 

^ Grades three to eight wil ho ;„ , ^"^^"^ Term 

portunities for prac s Lrohin! VT^" '''''°" "°^ ^" ^^ord op- 
grammar. United States hTstory° cfvillJ"^' °'~'?^o«™fy. arithmetic, 
study, sewing, cooking, and manua Itrailr'^rf' °' ''""'"^' "'''"^^ 

r7:i::urs::=rofTeTarnT"— -— 

«ent and state publiSrclasmcati^n'rnd''! ^ '""''''''' ^°-™- 
mounting nictures and mending books "^^^'"S'^S; «are of library, 

Satui^s 8:00-9:00 A. M. (Miss Milner.) 



36 



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